By, Amanda Knight

Mycah walked up the steps of our apartment one night. When I opened the door she was wet from running through the rain and I quickly invited her in as we both embraced.  In her hands, she held a gift bag and her usual big beautiful smile.  She handed us the gift and told my husband Gavin and I that we needed to open the gifts in front of her so she could see our reaction.

As I opened the gifts, I took out beautiful baby onesies full of colors, with dragons, cute sayings, and adorable prints.  Since Gavin and I announced our pregnancy, these were some of our first baby gifts so the feeling of gratitude was especially powerful.  But the clothes didn’t stop!  More and more outfits, all thoughtfully selected. I noticed a card still in our bag.  I eagerly reached for the card, but she stopped me. “…You have to wait until I leave to read that,” she said.

Instead, we chatted about her upcoming summer job. She was looking forward to returning to work at Kids Across America—an inner city summer camp. This would be her second year to serve.  Gavin and I were happy to congratulate her in person on her amazing grades in college (straight A’s!), her leadership on campus as a Resident Assistant, and her involvement at her church.

After chatting, we realized her ride was still waiting for her in the parking lot.  We thanked her and hugged goodbye.  She ran back through the rain while Gavin and I both sat down to look again at the beautiful clothes that God had blessed us with. It was more than just gifts we were admiring, but more importantly, the beautiful relationship that God had been molding for so many years. The relationship had impacted both Mycah and me!  It was humbling to think back on all the Bible studies, outings, trips, and stories Mycah and I had gone through together.  I gave God praise and then remembered the card still in the bag!  As I opened the card, I read Micah’s note. These words stuck out boldly:  “You’ve supported me…now it’s my turn to get to support you.”

In my training as a social work major, there was always talk of boundaries, which indeed are especially important. Some understand boundaries to mean no contact with people you serve outside of work hours.  As Christians though, I think there are significant times when we need to evaluate if our boundaries are keeping others from using their God-given gifts for the kingdom.

Those of us who are used to giving, or “providing services,” often can feel very awkward receiving.  But in the same way that Jesus said, “It is more blessed to give than to receive,” we cannot be selfish and always be the giver.  We must also allow others the opportunities to serve and to give, even if that means we are the receiver.  It is indeed a humbling place to receive.

It reminds me of the feeling Peter must have had when Jesus said He must wash Peter’s feet.  Peter’s initial reaction was, “No Way!  You can’t wash my feet!  Jesus, no!  I serve you! You don’t serve me.”  When we are usually the ones that give, it can feel so wrong receiving–like things are out of order. But we need to remember that Jesus told Peter, “Unless I wash you, you have no part with me.”  Then Peter said, “Then not just my feet but my hands and head as well!”

We don’t always know where we will see the Lord in our everyday lives.  If we are open to both giving and to receiving, we may see Jesus through the interactions of people all around us.

Amanda, far left, with a group of TML Alumni.